Book Log #6: Hidden Figures

Hidden Figures Young Readers Edition by Margot Lee Shetterly [Little Shop of Stories, Paperback]

I caught the movie with the kids last weekend before reading this book. Unfortunately, I had accidentally put the Young Readers Edition on my wishlist, and received it for Christmas. So, it was a tad simplistic… I kind of want to get the adult version and read it again.

The stories are interesting, and I’m glad I read (a version of) the book after seeing the movie, so I could sort the dramatization from the facts a bit. If the book is taken as the reality, then the movie did take some liberties with time and order of events, and even reassigned some things that happened to different characters, but overall the movie was by and large a true story, just reshaped for dramatic effect.

According to the book, John Glenn didn’t trust the IBM electronic computers, and did indeed ask for the “girl” to check the calculations on his reentry before he would take his historic flight, which was a touching point in the movie that seemed exaggerated. Nice to know that piece was true.

At any rate, it’s amazing that these stories haven’t been mainstream knowledge until now. They’re inspirational, to say the least.

Book Log #5: The Three Body Problem

The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu and translated by Ken Liu [Christmas gift, hardback, Little Shop of Stories]

This was originally recommended by… someone. Curt? Can’t remember. But then President Obama recommended it. And I figured if two totally unrelated sources recommended a book, I should probably listen.

I wasn’t disappointed. I feel like Cixin Liu is a Chinese Neal Stephenson. Lots of interesting sci-fi ideas mixed in with a dose of history… a very enjoyable read. It went pretty quickly.

I don’t know that I’ve ever read a book translated from Chinese, so… a first.

Again, it’s difficult to discuss without spoilers… but the story spans from the Cultural Revolution and its fallout to the “present day”, covering a couple generations and jumping back and forth in time with gradual reveals of what’s “really” going on. Reminiscent of Cryptonomicon.

Good read. Thanks, Obama.

Book Log #4 : Fuzzy Mud

Fuzzy Mud by Louis Sachar [Kindle, Amazon]

I finished reading Holes to my daughter, and the ads on the last page of the Kindle version mentioned Fuzzy Mud, which piqued her interest. So, using the insidious evil of instant gratification through ebook purchase, we dove into that.

It’s a fine story, though not quote Holes. The ending has a nice pragmatic, grey-area ending to it that’s refreshing.

It’s difficult to discuss the story without spoilers, so… it’s recommended for young readers.