Book Log 2017: Year in Review

Books read in 2004: 21
Books read in 2005: 28
Books read in 2006: 40
Books read in 2007: 30
Books read in 2008: 41
Books read in 2009: 22
Books read in 2010: 44
Books read in 2011: 28
Books read in 2012: 31
Books read in 2013: 8
Books read in 2014: 13
Books read in 2015: 18
Books read in 2016: 52
Books read in 2017: ~24

I’m writing this summary a year after the fact, as my logging fell apart in April 2017. There’s probably some missed books, but that’s on me.

24. The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.: A Novel by Neal Stephenson, Nicole Galland
A solid time travel romp. Can’t go wrong with Neal Stephenson; worst case you get a pretty good novel.

23. Artemis: A Novel by Andy Weir
Not as great as The Martian, but a darn fine novel worth reading.

22. The Sherlockian by Graham Moore
Mmm… okay book about fictionalized unsolved Sherlock mysteries.

21. The Last Days of Night: A Novel by Graham Moore
Tesla, Westinghouse, Edison in a fictionalized account. Pretty good.

20. Lockwood & Co. Book Five: The Empty Grave by Jonathan Stroud
19. Lockwood & Co. Book Four: The Creeping Shadow by Jonathan Stroud
So sad to see this YA series end. I’m hoping my kids dive into this one, but no takers yet.

18. Gnatz By M.H. Van Keuren
Another well-written near-future sci-fi novel. Disney-esque kid stars, nano-drone robots, drugs of forgetting… lots of cool elements to the tale, and engaging throughout.

17. The Inquisitor’s Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog by Adam Gidwitz and Hatem Aly
Read to Scout. Well written fantastical adventure story set in the time of King Louis of France.

16. Saga by Brian K. Vaughan
15. Y: The Last Man by Brian K. Vaughan
Two great graphic novel series. Y: The Last Man is complete, but I eagerly await the next edition of Saga.

14. Run Program by Scott Meyer
Meh. Not my favorite Scott Meyer, but even a minor work is worth a read from this author.

13. The Scrum Field Guide by Mitch Lacey
12. Scrum: a Breathtakingly Brief and Agile Introduction by Chris Sims, Hillary Louise Johnson [Kindle]
11. The Scrum Master Training Manual: A Guide to the Professional Scrum Master (PSM) Exam by Nader K. Rad, Frank Turley [Kindle]
10. Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time by Jeff Sutherland, JJ Sutherland [Kindle]
All of these for work… interesting methodology, though. I look forward to trying it out.

9. A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel by David Liss
Enjoyable historical fiction.

8. Lexicon by Max Barry
My wife scoffed at the premise when I described it, which only goes to show Max Barry is a better writer than I. Worth the read.

7. Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play
My wife saw the play and loved it… some gets lost in the reading rather than the viewing, but I see the bones of a very entertaining piece.

6. Hidden Figures Young Readers Edition by Margot Lee Shetterly
An excellent story that probably most folks have seen in movie form by now. I mistakenly got the Young Readers Edition, possibly the regular version would have been even better?

5. The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu and translated by Ken Liu
A rich novel chock full to the brim of ideas and good characters.

4. Fuzzy Mud by Louis Sachar
3. Holes by Louis Sachar
Read these with my daughter; Louis Sachar does not disappoint with well crafted stories that work for kids and adults alike.

2. The Supremes’ Greatest Hits by Michael G. Trachtman
Very readable summary of the most important cases by the Supreme Court. Highly recommended.

1. A More Perfect Constitution by Larry J. Sabato
I don’t know if we’ll ever have the political climate to allow for a third constitutional convention, but this book is thick with interesting ideas for updating

Book Log #7-#21: catching up…

Sometimes life gets in the way…

I haven’t sat down to document my reading, which, if past is prologue, will likely lead to me, yet again, walking into a bookshop, going “oh, this looks good”, buying a book, and then discovering halfway through the first chapter that I’d already read it.

This hasn’t happened since I started doing this in 2004. How many hundreds of dollars have I saved? Probably less than $100, but still… worth it.

So, in reverse order, here’s what I can remember… probably some I’m missing somewhere

?. The Wild Harmonic by Beth Patterson (unfinished) – still working on this one, but noting it for future reference

21. Lockwood & Co. Book Five: The Empty Grave by Jonathan Stroud
20. Lockwood & Co. Book Four: The Creeping Shadow by Jonathan Stroud
So sad to see this YA series end. I’m hoping my kids dive into this one, but no takers yet.

19. Gnatz By M.H. Van Keuren
Another well-written near-future sci-fi novel. Disney-esque kid stars, nano-drone robots, drugs of forgetting… lots of cool elements to the tale, and engaging throughout.

18. The Inquisitor’s Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog by Adam Gidwitz and Hatem Aly
Read to Scout. Well written fantastical adventure story set in the time of King Louis of France.

17. Saga by Brian K. Vaughan
16. Y: The Last Man by Brian K. Vaughan
Two great graphic novel series. Y: The Last Man is complete, but I eagerly await the next edition of Saga.

15. Run Program by Scott Meyer
Meh. Not my favorite Scott Meyer, but even a minor work is worth a read from this author.
14. The Scrum Field Guide by Mitch Lacey
13. Scrum: a Breathtakingly Brief and Agile Introduction by Chris Sims, Hillary Louise Johnson [Kindle]
12. The Scrum Master Training Manual: A Guide to the Professional Scrum Master (PSM) Exam by Nader K. Rad, Frank Turley [Kindle]
11. Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time by Jeff Sutherland, JJ Sutherland [Kindle]
All of these for work… interesting methodology, though. I look forward to trying it out.

10. Fuzzy Mud by Louis Sachar
Read to Scout. We both enjoyed it.

9. A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel by David Liss
Enjoyable historical fiction.

8. Lexicon by Max Barry
My wife scoffed at the premise when I described it, which only goes to show Max Barry is a better writer than I. Worth the read.

7. Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play
My wife saw the play and loved it… some gets lost in the reading rather than the viewing, but I see the bones of a very entertaining piece.

Book Log #6: Hidden Figures

Hidden Figures Young Readers Edition by Margot Lee Shetterly [Little Shop of Stories, Paperback]

I caught the movie with the kids last weekend before reading this book. Unfortunately, I had accidentally put the Young Readers Edition on my wishlist, and received it for Christmas. So, it was a tad simplistic… I kind of want to get the adult version and read it again.

The stories are interesting, and I’m glad I read (a version of) the book after seeing the movie, so I could sort the dramatization from the facts a bit. If the book is taken as the reality, then the movie did take some liberties with time and order of events, and even reassigned some things that happened to different characters, but overall the movie was by and large a true story, just reshaped for dramatic effect.

According to the book, John Glenn didn’t trust the IBM electronic computers, and did indeed ask for the “girl” to check the calculations on his reentry before he would take his historic flight, which was a touching point in the movie that seemed exaggerated. Nice to know that piece was true.

At any rate, it’s amazing that these stories haven’t been mainstream knowledge until now. They’re inspirational, to say the least.

Book Log #5: The Three Body Problem

The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu and translated by Ken Liu [Christmas gift, hardback, Little Shop of Stories]

This was originally recommended by… someone. Curt? Can’t remember. But then President Obama recommended it. And I figured if two totally unrelated sources recommended a book, I should probably listen.

I wasn’t disappointed. I feel like Cixin Liu is a Chinese Neal Stephenson. Lots of interesting sci-fi ideas mixed in with a dose of history… a very enjoyable read. It went pretty quickly.

I don’t know that I’ve ever read a book translated from Chinese, so… a first.

Again, it’s difficult to discuss without spoilers… but the story spans from the Cultural Revolution and its fallout to the “present day”, covering a couple generations and jumping back and forth in time with gradual reveals of what’s “really” going on. Reminiscent of Cryptonomicon.

Good read. Thanks, Obama.

Book Log #4 : Fuzzy Mud

Fuzzy Mud by Louis Sachar [Kindle, Amazon]

I finished reading Holes to my daughter, and the ads on the last page of the Kindle version mentioned Fuzzy Mud, which piqued her interest. So, using the insidious evil of instant gratification through ebook purchase, we dove into that.

It’s a fine story, though not quote Holes. The ending has a nice pragmatic, grey-area ending to it that’s refreshing.

It’s difficult to discuss the story without spoilers, so… it’s recommended for young readers.

Book Log #3: Holes

Holes by Louis Sachar [Amazon, Kindle, in library]

This was in our Kindle library from when my kids read it.

This book is great kid lit. The story of a wrongly accused kid sent to a “rehabilitation” camp where inmates dig 5 foot by 5 foot holes every day in a desert, purportedly to build character. But there is something more to Camp Green Lake…

Engaging, extremely well written, amusing, and entertaining. I’d heard good things about it, from my kids and others, and it lived up to the hype.

Book Log #2: The Supremes’ Greatest Hits

The Supremes’ Greatest Hits: The 44 Supreme Court Cases that Most Directly Affect Your Life by Michael G. Trachtman [Little Shop of Stories, Paperback, Xmas gift]

This was a fascinating summary of some biggies; most I knew about, but many I was unaware of, and almost all I was unaware of the the nitty-gritty details.

In general, I’m a left-leaning person, but I also like to do things by the letter and spirit of the law. More than once I was pleased with an outcome while simultaneously not comfortable with the reasoning that got us there, and vice-versa.

I came away with the sense that law is a messy business, and thoroughly fascinating. Good (and quick) read.

Book Log #1: A More Perfect Constitution

A More Perfect Constitution by Larry J. Sabato [Amazon, Kindle]

It may seem a reaction to the recent election, but my first couple of books for 2017 are government related. Both of these came as recommendations from the older sister of one of my daughter’s robotics teammates. She is a 12-13 year old Supreme Court groupie who had recently visited Washington D.C., and had picked up these two books there.

This first one was a fascinating set of proposals for a new Constitutional Convention. The argument being that the framers had always envisioned that the Constitution would be adjusted occasionally as the country gained experience, and it was well overdue after 220 years.

The author lays out twenty-something adjustments to the constitution, none of which are hot-button issues (abortion, gay marriage, etc) as he firmly believes those divining rods should be off the table for a successful Constitutional Convention.

I thought all of the suggestions were reasonable, though I thought his arguments in favor on a few were not particularly strong and would need to be fleshed out a bit.

As part of his research for the book, he did polling to see how his suggestions would currently be received by the populace, and I was surprised at the low support for a few of the better ideas (IMHO).

Particularly, he suggested a 2 year National Service requirement for all citizens. In short, each citizen would be required to work in a service capacity, either military or civilian, preferably between the ages of 18-26. In return for minimum wage, the measure would garner a sense of civic duty and volunteerism, provide a good way to develop experience, and apply manpower to the nations challenges.

It’s something I wish I had done, and with a well organized system of doing so, I think I would have enjoyed it. There’s a nice social engineering aspect, in that all citizens, regardless of wealth or class, would have a shared common experience.

At any rate, the thought of organizing a second Constitutional Convetion seems so overwhelming as to be impossible, but the author recommends slow and deliberate progress is the way to go.

I’m for it.